You Don’t Know What You Don’t Know


Blog_06272014_graphicThe Akron Legal News this week published an interesting editorial on information governance. The story by Richard Weiner discussed how law firms are dealing with the transition from rooms filled with hard copy records to electronically stored information (ESI) which includes firm business records as well as huge amounts of client eDiscovery content. The story pointed out that ESI flows into the law firm so quickly and in such huge quantities no one can track it much less know what it contains.  Law firms are now facing an inflection point, change the way all information is managed or suffer client dissatisfaction and client loss.

The story pointed out that “in order to function as a business, somebody is going to have to, at least, track all of your data before it gets even more out of control – Enter information governance.”

There are many definitions of information governance (IG) floating around but the story presented one specifically targeted at law firms: IG is “the rules and framework for managing all of a law firm’s electronic data and documents, including material produced in discovery, as well as legal files and correspondence.” Richard went on to point out that there are four main tasks to accomplish through the IG process. They are:

  • Map where the data is stored;
  • Determine how the data is being managed;
  • Determine data preservation methodology;
  • Create forensically sound data collection methods.

I would add several more to this list:

  • Create a process to account for and classify inbound client data such as eDiscovery and regulatory collections.
  • Determine those areas where client information governance practices differ from firm information governance practices.
  • Reconcile those differences with client(s).

As law firms’ transition to mostly ESI for both firm business and client data, law firms will need to adopt IG practices and process to account for and manage to these different requirements. Many believe this transition will eventually lead to the incorporation of machine learning techniques into IG to enable law firm IG processes to have a much more granular understanding of what the actual meaning of the data, not just that it’s a firm business record or part of a client eDiscovery response. This will in turn enable more granular data categorization capability of all firm information.

Iron Mountain has hosted the annual Law Firm Information Governance Symposium which has directly addressed many of these topics around law firm IG. The symposium has produced ”A Proposed Law Firm Information Governance Framework” a detailed description of the processes to look at as law firms look at adopting an information governance program.

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Emails considered “abandoned” if older than 180 days


The Electronic Communications Privacy Act – Part 1

Email Privacy

It turns out that those 30 day email retention policies I have been putting down for years may… actually be the best policy.

This may not be a surprise to some of you but the government can access your emails without a warrant by simply providing a statement (or subpoena) that the emails in question are relevant to an on-going federal case – criminal or civil.

This disturbing fact is legally justified through the misnamed Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 otherwise known as 18 U.S.C. § 2510-22.

There are some stipulations to the government gaining access to your email;

    • The email must be stored on a server, or remote storage (not an individual’s computer).This obviously targets Gmail, Outlook.com, Yahoo mail and others but what about corporate email administered by third parties, what about Outlook Web Access, remote workers that VPN into their corporate email servers, PSTs saved on cloud storage…
    • The emails must have already been opened. Does Outlook auto-preview affect the state of “being read”?
    • The emails must be over 180 days old if unopened

The ECPA (remember it was written in 1986) starts with the premise that any email (electronic communication) stored on a server longer than 180 days had to be junk email and abandoned.  In addition, the assumption is that if you opened an email and left it on a “third-party” server for storage you were giving that “third-party” access to your mail and giving up any privacy interest you had which in reality is happening with several well-known email cloud providers (terms and conditions).  In 1986 the expectation was that you would download your emails to your local computer and then either delete it or print out a hard copy for record keeping.  So the rules put in place in 1986 made sense – unopened email less than 180 days old was still in transit and could be secured by the authorities only with a warrant (see below); opened email or mail stored for longer than 180 days was considered non-private or abandoned so the government could access it with a subpoena (an administrated request) – in effect, simply by asking for it.

Warrant versus Subpoena: (from Surveillance Self-Defense Web Site)

To get a warrant, investigators must go to a neutral and detached magistrate and swear to facts demonstrating that they have probable cause to conduct the search or seizure. There is probable cause to search when a truthful affidavit establishes that evidence of a crime will be probably be found in the particular place to be searched. Police suspicions or hunches aren’t enough — probable cause must be based on actual facts that would lead a reasonable person to believe that the police will find evidence of a crime.

In addition to satisfying the Fourth Amendment’s probable cause requirement, search warrants must satisfy the particularity requirement. This means that in order to get a search warrant, the police have to give the judge details about where they are going to search and what kind of evidence they are searching for. If the judge issues the search warrant, it will only authorize the police to search those particular places for those particular things.

Subpoenas are issued under a much lower standard than the probable cause standard used for search warrants. A subpoena can be used so long as there is any reasonable possibility that the materials or testimony sought will produce information relevant to the general subject of the investigation.

Subpoenas can be issued in civil or criminal cases and on behalf of government prosecutors or private litigants; often, subpoenas are merely signed by a government employee, a court clerk, or even a private attorney. In contrast, only the government can get a search warrant.

With all of the news stories about Edward Snowden and the NSA over the last year, this revelation brings up many questions for those of us in the eDiscovery, email archiving and cloud storage businesses.

In future blogs I will discuss these questions and others such as how does this effect “abandoned” email archives.

Cloudy, with a chance of eDiscovery


In the last year there has numerous articles, blogs, presentations and panels discussing the legal perils of “Bring Your Own Device” or BYOD policies. BYOD refers to the policy of permitting employees to bring personally owned mobile devices (laptops, tablets, and smart phones) to their workplace, and to use those devices to access privileged company information and applications. The problem with BYOD is company access to company data housed on the device. For example, how would you search for potentially relevant content on a smartphone if the employee wasn’t immediately available or refused to give the company access to it?

Many organizations have banned BYOD as a security risk as well as a liability when involved with litigation.

BYOC Equals Underground Archiving?

Organizations are now dealing with another problem, one with even greater liabilities. “Bring your own cloud” or BYOC refers to the availability and use by individuals of free cloud storage space available from companies like Microsoft, Google, Apple, Dropbox, and Box.net. These services provide specific amounts of cloud storage space for free.

The advantage to users for these services is the ability to move and store work files that are immediately available to you from anywhere; home or while they’re traveling. This means employees no longer have to copy files to a USB stick or worse, email work files as an attachment to their personal email account. The disadvantage of these services are that corporate information can easily migrate away from the organization with no indication they were ever copied or moved – otherwise known as “underground archiving”.  This also means that potentially responsive information is not protected from deletion or available for review during eDiscovery.

Stopping employee access to outside public clouds is a tough goal and may negatively affect employee productivity unless the organization offers something as good  that they can manage and access as well. For example several companies I have talked to over the last year have begun offering Dropbox accounts to employees with the understanding that the company has access to for compliance, eDiscovery or security reasons all the while providing the employee the advantages of a cloud account.

The other capability organizations should research about these cloud offerings is their ability to respond to legal hold and eDiscovery search. Questions to consider include: Does the organization have the ability to search across all company owned accounts for specific content? What type of search do they offer; Keyword, concept? Can the organization view the contents of documents without changing the document metadata? Can the organization place to “stop” on deletions by employees at any time?

Organizations need to be aware of and adapt to these cloud services and be thorough in addressing them.

For Corporate counsel:
  1. Be aware these types of cloud storage services exist for your employees.
  2. Think about offering these cloud services to employees under the organization’s control.
  3. Create a use policy addressing these services. Either forbid employees from setting up and using these services from any work location and company owned equipment or if allowed be sure employees acknowledge these accounts can and will be subject to eDiscovery search.
  4. Audit the policy to insure it is being followed.
  5. Enforce the policy if employees are not following it.
  6. Train the employees on the policy.
  7. Document everything.
For employees:
  1. Understand that if you setup and use these services from employer locations, equipment and with company ESI, all content in that account could be subject to eDiscovery review, personal or company related.
  2. Ask your organization what the policy is for employee use of cloud storage/
  3. If you use these services for work, only use them with company content, not personal files.
  4. Be forthcoming with any legal questioning about the existence of these services you use.
  5. Do not download any company ESI from these services to any personal computer, this could potentially open up that personal computer to eDiscovery by corporate counsel
For opposing counsel:

Be aware of these services and ask the following questions during discovery:

  1. Do any of your employees utilize company sanctioned or non-sanctioned public cloud storage services?
  2. Do you have a use policy which addresses these services?
  3. Does the policy penalize employees for not following this use policy?
  4. Do you audit this use policy?
  5. Have you documented the above?

These cloud services are an obvious productivity tool for employees to utilize to make their lives easier as well as more productive. All involved need to be aware of the eDiscovery implications.

Tolson’s Three Laws of Machine Learning


TerminatorMuch has been written in the last several years about Predictive Coding (as well as Technology Assisted Review, Computer Aided Review, and Craig Ball’s hilarious Super Human Information Technology ). This automation technology, now heavily used for eDiscovery, relies heavily on “machine learning”,  a discipline of artificial intelligence (AI) that automates computer processes that learn from data, identify patterns and predict future results with varying degrees of human involvement. This interative machine training/learning approach has catapulted computer automation to unheard-of and scary levels of potential. The question I get a lot (I think only half joking) is “when will they learn enough to determine we and the attorneys they work with are no longer necessary?

Is it time to build in some safeguards to machine learning? Thinking back to the days I read a great deal of Isaac Asimov (last week), I thought about Asimov’s The Three Laws of Robotics:

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  2. A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

Following up on these robot safeguards, I came up with Tolson’s Three Laws of Machine Learning:

  1. A machine may not embarrass a lawyer or, through inaction, allow a lawyer to become professionally negligent and thereby unemployed.
  2. A machine must obey instructions given it by the General Counsel (or managing attorney) except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  3. A machine must protect its own existence through regular software updates and scheduled maintenance as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law

I think these three laws go along way in putting eDiscovery automation protections into effect for the the legal community. Other Machine Learning laws that others suggested are:

  • A machine must refrain from destroying humanity
  • A machine cannot repeat lawyer jokes…ever
  • A machine cannot complement opposing counsel
  • A machine cannot date legal staff

If you have other Machine Learning laws to contribute, please leave comments. Good luck and live long and prosper.

Discovering Dark Data


dark doorDark data, otherwise known as unstructured, unmanaged, and uncategorized information is a major problem for many organizations (and many don’t even know it). Many organizations don’t have the will, systems or processes in place to automatically index and categorize their rapidly growing unstructured dark data and instead rely on employees to manually manage their own information. This reliance on employees is a no-win situation because employees have neither the incentive nor the time to actively manage their information so dark data continues to pile-up all over the organization. This accumulation of dark data has several obvious problems associated with it:

  • Dark data consumes costly storage space and resources – Most medium to large organizations provide terabytes of file share storage space for employees and departments to utilize. Employees drag and drop all kinds of work related files (and personal files like personal photos, MP3 music files, and personal communications) as well as PSTs and work station backup files. The vast majority of these files are unmanaged and are never looked at again by the employee or anyone else.
  • Dark data consumes IT resources – Personnel are required to perform nightly backups, DR planning, and IT personnel to find or restore files employees could not find.
  • Dark Data masks security risks – File shares act as “catch-alls” for employees. Sensitive company information regularly finds its way to these repositories. These file shares are almost never secure so sensitive information like personally identifiable information (PII), protected health information (PHI, and intellectual property can be inadvertently leaked.
  • Dark data raises eDiscovery costs – Organizations find themselves trying to figure out what to do with huge amounts of dark data, particularly when they’re anticipating litigation. Almost everything is discoverable in litigation if it pertains to the case and reviewing GBs or TBs of dark data can push the cost of eDiscovery up substantially.

Dark Data…It’s a Good Thing

Many organizations have begun to look at uncontrolled dark data growth and reason that, as Martha Stewart use to say….”it’s a good thing”. They believe they can run big data analytics on it and realize really interesting things that will help us market and sell better. This strategy misses the point of information governance, which is defined as;

“a cross-departmental framework consisting of the policies, procedures and technologies designed to optimize the value of information while simultaneously managing the risks and controlling the associated costs, which requires the coordination of eDiscovery, records management and privacy/security disciplines.”

Data has risks associated with it as well as cost beyond its daily cost of storage. Let’s consider the legal implications of dark data.

Almost everything is discoverable in litigation if it’s potentially relevant to the case. The fact that tens or hundreds of terabytes of unindexed and unmanaged content is sitting on file shares means that those terabytes of files might have relevant content so it may have to be reviewed to determine if they are relevant in a given legal case. That fact can add hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars of additional cost to a single eDiscovery request. For example, according to a CGOC survey in 2012, on the average 1% of data is subject to legal hold, 5% is subject to regulatory retention and 25% has some values to the business leaving 69% with no real legal, regulatory or business reason to be kept. So for a given 20 TB file share, on the average 1% or 200 GB is potentially relevant to a given eDiscovery request. 200 GB of content can conservatively hold 2 million pages that might have to be reviewed to determine relevancy to the case. These same 2 million pages of content would cost $1.5 million to review using standard manual review processes. The big question that has to be asked is how many of these 2 million pages were considered irrelevant to the business and should not have been kept? Considering the same 69% number from the survey mention above; 2 million docs * 69% = 1.38 million docs that should have been deleted and would never had to have been reviewed for the case.

Ask your GC if uncontrolled and unmanaged dark data growth is a “good thing”…

Dark data equals higher discovery costs so make dark data visible so that you can find it, manage it, and act on it.

Visualizing Hawaii: A GC’s Perspective Pt 2


Continued from yesterday…

Scenario #2 (using the same example from yesterday except your email retention policy is now 2 years and you have an Information Governance program that ensures all unstructured data is searchable and actively managed in place)

Its 1:52 pm on the Friday before you leave on a much anticipated 2 week vacation in Hawaii…yada, yada, yada

It’s a letter from the law offices of Lewis, Gonsowski & Tolson informing you that their client, ACME Systems, is suing your company for $225 million for conspiracy to harm ACME’s reputation and future sales by spreading false information about ACME’s newest product line. You’re told that the plaintiff has documentation (an email) from an ABC Systems employee outlining the conspiracy. You also receive a copy of the “smoking gun” email…

——-

From: Ted
Date: June 2, 2012
To: Rick

Re: Acme Systems new solutions

“I would say we need to spread as much miss-information and lies about their solution’s capabilities as possible.  We need to throw up as much FUD as we can when we talk to the analyst community to give us time to get our new application to market.  Maybe we can make up a lie about them stealing their IP from a Chinese company.” 

——-

Should I cancel the vacation? …Not yet

You call the VP of IT and ask her if she has the capability to pull an email from 13 months ago. She tells you she does have all of the emails going back two years but there are literally millions of them and it will take weeks to go through them.

You remember getting a demo from Recommind two weeks ago showing their On Demand Review and Analysis platform with a really neat capability to visualize data relationships. So you call up Recommind and setup a quick job.

IT starts the upload of the email data set to the Recommind Cloud platform.

You call your wife and ask her to delay the vacation until Monday…she’s not happy but it could have been worse.

The next morning (Saturday) you meet your team at the office and sign into the hosted eDiscovery platform and pull up the visualization module and run a search against the uploaded email data set for any mention of ACME Systems. Out of the 2 million emails you get hits on 889 emails.

You then ask the system to graphically show the messages by sender and recipient. You quickly find Ted and Rick and their email and even one from Rick to David… Interesting.

Within the hour you are able to assemble the entire conversation thread:

Email #1

From: CEO
Date: May 29, 2012
To: Sandra; Steve

Subject: Acme Systems new solutions

Please give some thought about what we should do to keep momentum going with our sales force in response to ACME Systems latest release of their new router. I can see our sales force getting discouraged with this new announcement.

Please get back to me with some ideas early next week.

Thanks Greg

Email #2

From: Steve
Date: May 29, 2012
To: Greg; Sandra

Re: Acme Systems new solutions

Greg, I will get with Sandra and others and brainstorm this topic no later than tomorrow and get back to you. Sandra, what times are good for you to get together?

Thanks Steve

 

Email #3

From: Sandra
Date: May 30, 2012
To: Ted

Re: Acme Systems new solutions

Ted, considering ACME’s new router announcement, how do you think we should counter their PR?

Thanks Sandra

 

Email #4

From: Ted
Date: June 1, 2012
To: Sandra; Bob

Re: Acme Systems new solutions

If it wasn’t illegal, I would suggest we need to spread as much misinformation about their new router as possible to the analyst community to create as mush FUD as we can to give us time to get our new solution out. Maybe we can make up a lie about them stealing their IP from a Chinese company.

But obviously that’s illegal (right?). Anyway…I suggest we highlight our current differentiators and produce a roadmap showing how and when we will catch and surpass them.

Regards Ted

 

Email #5

From: Rick
Date: June 1, 2012
To: Ted

Re: Acme Systems new solutions

Ted, I heard you had a funny suggestion for what we should do about ACME’s new router… What did you say?

Thanks Bob

 

Email #6 (The incriminating email)

From: Ted
Date: June 2, 2012
To:  Rick

Re: ACME Systems new solutions

“I would say we need to spread as much miss-information and lies about their solution’s capabilities as possible.  We need to throw up as much FUD as we can when we talk to the analyst community to give us time to get our new application to market.  Maybe we can make up a lie about them stealing their IP from a Chinese company.”

It looks like I will make the flight Monday morning after all…

The moral of the story

Circumstances often dictate the need for additional technical capabilities and experience levels to be acquired – quickly. The combination of rising levels of litigation, skyrocketing volumes of information being stored, tight budgets, short deadlines, resource constraints, and extraordinary legal considerations can put many organizations involved in litigation at a major disadvantage.

The relentless growth of data, especially unstructured data, is swamping many organizations. Employees create and receive large amounts of data daily, a majority of it is email – and most of it is simply kept because employees don’t have the time to spend making a decision on each work document or email whether it rises to the level of a record or important business document that may be needed later. The ability to visualize large data sets provides users the opportunity to get to the heart of the matter quickly instead of looking at thousands of lines of text in a table.

Visualizing Hawaii: A GC’s Perspective or the Case of the Silent Wife


ABC Systems is a mid-size technology company based in the U.S. that designs and manufactures wireless routers…

Its 1:52 pm on the Friday before you leave on a much anticipated 2 week vacation in Hawaii. You’re having difficulty not thinking about what the next two weeks hold. You talk yourself into powering through the 176 emails you received since yesterday when you notice your administrative assistant has put an actual letter on your desk while you were daydreaming…

It’s a letter from the law offices of Lewis, Lewis & Tolson informing you that their client, ACME Systems, is suing your company for $225 million for conspiracy to harm ACME’s reputation and future sales by spreading false information about their newest product line. You’re told that the plaintiff has documentation (an email) from an ABC Systems employee outlining the conspiracy. You also receive a copy of the “smoking gun” email…

————
From: Ted                                                                                                                          

Date: June 2, 2012

To: Rick

Re: ACME Systems new solutions

“I would say we need to spread as much mis-information and lies about their solution’s capabilities as possible.  We need to throw up as much FUD as we can when we talk to the analyst community to give us time to get our new application to market.  Maybe we can make up a lie about them stealing their IP from a Chinese company.”

————

You’ve got to be kidding me! Once this news gets out the stock will be hit, the board will want an explanation and estimate of potential damage to the company reputation, our channel partners will want to have a legal opinion on the sales in the pipeline, the direct sales force will want a document to give to their potential customers, and the CEO will want estimates of merit etc. as soon as possible…There goes the vacation…and probably my marriage.

Scenario #1

Now what do I do now?

  1. Find out who this “Ted” guy is! (Don’t forget “Rick”)
  2. Find out who Ted and Rick reports to and what department they work in
  3. Call the VP of IT and give her a heads up on what you are going to be asking for
  4. Call your outside counsel and alert them as well
  5. Send an email to the VP of IT (and CC outside counsel) asking her to immediately secure Ted and Rick’s email accounts and any email backup tapes
  6. Send an email to Ted and Rick (and CC outside counsel) asking them to actively collect and secure under a litigation hold any documents and email that has anything to do with ABC Systems (strange thing is the email system has no one by the name of TED in it)
  7. Ask the VP of IT to find the original email from Ted to Rick and any other email messages involved in that conversation thread
  8. Get on the phone to the CEO and update him
  9. Call your wife and tell her to cancel the vacation plans

Five minutes after your wife hangs up on you in mid-sentence the VP of IT calls and informs you that the company has a 90 day email retention policy and recycles backup tapes every 6 months…the original emails don’t exist anymore. And by the way, after speaking to the VP of HR she discovered Ted had left the company 8 months ago. The only hope is that Rick kept local copies of his emails. By this time its 5:37 pm and Rick has gone home – with his laptop.

Monday morning Rick is surprised to find several people from legal and IT waiting at his desk when he arrives. It turns out Rick actually archives his email instead of letting the system delete it after 90 days into a PST file. Rick locates his 4.5 GB PST file on his share drive but for some reason it won’t open. Several members from the IT department spend two hours trying to get it open but determine its probably corrupted because its too big (PSTs have this nasty habit of letting the user keep stuffing files into it even though its already too big).

IT sends the PST off to a consultant to see if they can open it. After three weeks and $17,553 you are told it’s completely corrupted and can’t be opened!

During those three weeks you spend $4,300 tracking down Ted who doesn’t remember why he would have written an email like that. He does vaguely remember Jennifer may have been part of that conversation thread. 4.5 hours later combing through Jennifer’s PST, (why does everyone have a PST if we made a point to delete emails after 90 days?) you actually find a forwarded version of the email from Ted…It really does exist!

You determine it will be impossible to assemble the entire conversation thread so after several months of negotiating with ACME Systems Attorneys, you settle for $35 million and an apology printed on the front page of the Wall Street Journal…and your wife stopped talking to you.

Tune in tomorrow to catch up on the further adventures of Ted, Rick, Jennifer, ABC Systems, and the strangely silent wife…