Successful Predictive Coding Adoption is Dependent on Effective Information Governance


Predictive coding has been receiving a great deal of press lately (for good reason), especially with the ongoing case; Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe, No. 11 Civ. 1279 (ALC) (AJP), 2012 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 23350 (S.D.N.Y. Feb. 24, 2012). On May 21, the plaintiffs filed Rule 72(a) objections to Magistrate Judge Peck’s May 7, 2012 discovery rulings related to the relevance of certain documents that comprise the seed set of the parties’ ESI protocol. 

This Rule 72(a) objection highlights an important point in the adoption of predictive coding technologies; the technology is only as good as the people AND processes supporting it.

To review, predictive coding is a process where a computer (with the requisite software), does the vast majority of the work of deciding whether data is relevant, responsive or privileged to a given case.

Beyond simply searching for keyword matching (byte for byte), predictive coding adopts a computer self-learning approach. To accomplish this, attorneys and other legal professionals provide example responsive documents/data in a statistically sufficient quantity which in turn “trains”the computer as to what relevant documents/content should be flagged and set aside for discovery. This is done in an iterative process where legally trained professionals fine-tune the seed set over a period of time to a point where the seed set represents a statistically relevant sample which includes examples of all possible relevant content as well as formats. This capability can also be used to find and secure privileged documents. Instead of legally trained people reading every document to determine if a document is relevant to a case, the computer can perform a first pass of this task in a fraction of the time with much more repeatable results. This technology is exciting in that it can dramatically reduce the cost of the discovery/review process by as much as 80% according to the RAND Institute of Civil Justice.

By now you may be asking yourself what this has to do with Information Governance?…

For predictive coding to become fully adopted across the legal spectrum, all sides have to agree 1. the technology works as advertised, and 2. the legal professionals are providing the system with the proper seed sets for it to learn from. To accomplish the second point above, the seed set must include content from all possible sources of information. If the seed set trainers don’t have access to all potentially responsive content to draw from, then the seed set is in question.

Knowing where all the information resides and having the ability to retrieve it quickly is imperative to an effective discovery process. Records/Information Management professionals should view this new technology as an opportunity to become an even more essential partner to the legal department and entire organization by not just focusing on “records” but on information across the entire enterprise. With full fledged information management programs in place, the legal department will be able to fully embrace this technology to drastically reduce their cost of discovery.

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Putting some real teeth in eDiscovery sanctions will drive effective information management


Ok, I know there is a push back from the legal industry in reference to the problem of the cost of discovery. Yes, companies create, use, receive and delete huge amounts of electronic information on a daily basis and it is unreasonable to expect an organization to have enough of a handle on this moving target to be able to place an effective legal hold – quickly, and provide all responsive information in response to an eDiscovery request. But come on… organizations live and die by their information, especially electronic information and if an organization doesn’t have enough of a handle on their data to be able to place a legal hold on select data, then I’m sorry they have other problems.

It all comes down to effective information management. Why is it unreasonable for a Judge to expect a company knows what data it has at any point in time and can find it when it needs to?

I understand the proportionality doctrine argument, and it makes sense. If proportionality did not exist, a plaintiff’s counsel could win every case just based on how they construct their discovery request.

Many businesses in the United States have long given employees total control of the company records, with a few exceptions, with little or no central control or even knowledge the information exists and how it pertains to the business. This does not seem the best business decision for the long run.

Maybe eDiscovery can serve as the impetus to nudge companies to start taking information management seriously. If Judges start imposing even larger penalties and fines for what amounts to eDiscovery failings because of ineffective or no information management policies in an organization, then we may see a corporate change of attitude.

In a recent LTN Law Technology News article, e-discovery analyst Barry Murphy of Murphy Insights noted that very few sanctions for e-discovery have had any real teeth, and the few that have involved large dollar amounts have been overturned. In some cases, e-discovery snafus have led to negative inferences that almost certainly impacted the outcome, but he says even those rulings seem to have had little impact. “The sanctions we’re seeing are too small to register with many people, and while negative inferences may lead to a bad outcome, the impact is not always obvious,” says Murphy. “Once we see a sanction for many millions of dollars because of a failure to preserve electronic evidence, the point will be clearer.”

Let me offer some common sense suggestions around information management and eDiscovery:

  1. Have regularly updated and tested records retention policies
  2. Get rid of data your business no longer needs
  3. Really know what electronically stored information (ESI) you have and don’t have
  4. Be ready to find it quickly
  5. If you are a big enough organization, have tools on hand to help in the searches
  6. Have a tested litigation hold process. Be able to stop records deletions based on content, employee, date etc. quickly
  7. Have a tested eDiscovery process

Too many organizations are willing to risk the consequences; “It’s never happened to me before”. If you manage your ESI effectively, then discovery response should not be a problem